About the Situated Learning Theory

Situated learning is the type of learning which will occur in the very same context that it was applied. This learning type was initially proposed by Etienne Wenger and Jean Lave as a learning model for groups of individuals who share the same profession or craft. For example, a “community of practice”. The tenet of these theories involves that abstract knowledge typically provided in classrooms is difficult to retain.

Learning that is real only occurs once it has become contextual. This means when the students are able to apply it directly in authentic cultures, contexts and activities. An example of this would be would be students of electrical mechanics have a better and more knowledgeable understanding on electrical circuits compared to engineering students that mainly only have theoretical knowledge and a limited practical understanding on how these electrical circuits operate. This is due to the fact that the electrical mechanic students benefits directly when they achieve success and the outcomes when they make a mistake in their learning processes.

Four Ways That the Situated Learning Theory Can Be Applied

The environments for situated learning places the students into learning situations where they are immersed actively in activities, while they use problem-solving or critical thinking skills. These types of opportunities should be associated with social communities that are able to replicate a real world situation. Situational leadership courses should be able to encourage the students to use their previous knowledge and then challenge the other students in this community. Ways in which to apply these theories can include:

Group Activities

This can include a field trip whereby the students are allowed to participate actively in unfamiliar environments. Practical experiences and accommodative education whereby the students become physically involved and engrossed in the actual working environment. This can involve sports and music … Read More

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